asylum-art

asylum-art:

Paul Cummins: 888,246 Ceramic Poppies Flow Like Blood from the Tower of London to Commemorate WWIt 

The moat that surrounds the Tower of London has long stood empty and dry. This summer, it’s getting filled with 888,246 red ceramic poppies, one for each British and Colonial soldiers who perished during World War I.

For the past few weeks, a team of 150 volunteers has been placing red ceramic poppies one by one around the Tower. Crawford Butler, the longest serving Yeoman Warden, also known as beefeater, planted the first ceramic poppy. The last poppy will be symbolically planted on the last day of the installation: November 11, Armistice Day. 

daxmacoda

dichotomized:

The prepared but undelivered “Moon Disaster” speech that was to be given by Nixon in the highly likely event that Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin could not reunite with the Lunar Module. They would have been left to die on the moon:

"Fate has ordained that the men who went to the moon to explore in peace will stay on the moon to rest in peace. These brave men, Neil Armstrong and Edwin Aldrin, know that there is no hope for their recovery. But they also know that there is hope for mankind in their sacrifice. These two men are laying down their lives in mankind’s most noble goal: the search for truth and understanding. They will be mourned by their families and friends; they will be mourned by their nation; they will be mourned by the people of the world; they will be mourned by a Mother Earth that dared send two of her sons into the unknown. In their exploration, they stirred the people of the world to feel as one; in their sacrifice, they bind more tightly the brotherhood of man. In ancient days, men looked at stars and saw their heroes in the constellations. In modern times, we do much the same, but our heroes are epic men of flesh and blood. Others will follow, and surely find their way home. Man’s search will not be denied. But these men were the first, and they will remain the foremost in our hearts. For every human being who looks up at the moon in the nights to come will know that there is some corner of another world that is forever mankind."

daxmacoda
kinshishi:

wendyss:

Ruby Bridges, the first African-American child to attend an all-white elementary school in the American South, escorted by U.S. Marshals dispatched by President Eisenhower for her safety. 14 November, 1960

from Wikipedia:
"That first day, Bridges and her adult companions spent the entire day in the principal’s office; the chaos of the school prevented their moving to the classroom until the second day. Every morning, as Bridges walked to school, one woman would threaten to poison her;[7] because of this, the U.S. Marshals dispatched by President Eisenhower, who were overseeing her safety, only allowed Ruby to eat food that she brought from home.
Another woman at the school put a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and protested with it outside the school, a sight that Bridges Hall has said “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.” At her mother’s suggestion, Bridges began to pray on the way to school, which she found provided protection from the comments yelled at her on the daily walks.[8]”
This girl was six years old when she went through this.

kinshishi:

wendyss:

Ruby Bridges, the first African-American child to attend an all-white elementary school in the American South, escorted by U.S. Marshals dispatched by President Eisenhower for her safety. 14 November, 1960

from Wikipedia:

"That first day, Bridges and her adult companions spent the entire day in the principal’s office; the chaos of the school prevented their moving to the classroom until the second day. Every morning, as Bridges walked to school, one woman would threaten to poison her;[7] because of this, the U.S. Marshals dispatched by President Eisenhower, who were overseeing her safety, only allowed Ruby to eat food that she brought from home.

Another woman at the school put a black baby doll in a wooden coffin and protested with it outside the school, a sight that Bridges Hall has said “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.” At her mother’s suggestion, Bridges began to pray on the way to school, which she found provided protection from the comments yelled at her on the daily walks.[8]”

This girl was six years old when she went through this.